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Wednesday, September 28, 2011

And This Year's Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductees Should Be...

image from abcnewsradioonline.com

September 27, 2011: The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame announced its nominees for the 2012 class. See the DMDB blog entry And This Year’s Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Nominees Are… for details on who was nominated and who looks to be the best bets to get in. Of course, the new roster of nominees stirs a long-standing frustration over who keeps getting passed over. Heck, this subject served as the first DMDB blog entry, How to Get into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, in January 2009.

So who has been unfairly overlooked? If the DMDB was in charge of the 2012 inductees, these would be the five to get in. Note: click on acts’ names to see their entries in the DMDB music makers’ encyclopedia.


Kiss

In February, I wrote a blog entry entitled Why Kiss Belong in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. I’m actually not a Kiss fan, but my argument is that it is impossible to overlook a band that is the embodiment of rock and roll. The popular criticism is that the band uses elaborate stage shows to mask an absence of substance. They may appeal to the crotch, but not the head. Any self-respecting adult would have long ago purged their collections of any traces of the group. Uh, note to the Rock Hall – apparently you’ve forgotten how much of rock and roll is about music which appeals to young adults because it is all about sex and over-the-top showmanship. By the way, once Kiss gets in, make way for the New York Dolls, Judas Priest, and Iron Maiden. That also opens the door to hair bands. Most worthy of induction are Bon Jovi and Def Leppard.

image from omg.yahoo.com


Gram Parsons

Earlier this month, I wrote a blog entry about Parsons (Country-rock pioneer Gram Parsons died: September 19, 1973). That offers a brief overview of Parsons’ contributions. To sum it up here, writer Radley Balko argues that “Parsons may be the most influential artist yet to be inducted in either the Rock and Roll or Country Music Hall(s) of Fame”. The man who has been called “The Father of Country Rock” has four DMDB top 1000 albums – his own G.P. and Grievous Angel as well as The Byrds’ Sweetheart of the Rodeo and The Flying Burrito Brothers’ Gilded Palace of Sin. Groups like the Eagles and Poco owe their very existence to the foundation he helped build.

image from aquariumdrunkard.com


Rush

Rufus over Rush? The Hall has rightly acknowledged many R&B acts who have significantly shaped rock and roll. In its first two years, the Hall inducted Ray Charles, James Brown, Sam Cooke, Aretha Franklin, Marvin Gaye, and Louis Jordan. However, years after the R&B base has been more than acknowledged, the Hall continues to hail R&B acts (the 2012 nominees include Rufus, The Spinners, War, and Donna Summer) at the expense of acts which have been rock first and foremost. This is glaringly apparent when it comes to progressive rock. The Hall has an obvious bias against it, having only inducted Genesis from the genre. Still failing to receive acknowledgement are Rush; Yes; King Crimson; Jethro Tull; The Moody Blues; and Emerson, Lake & Palmer. All of these acts are worthy, but if I could only pick one, I’d go with Rush as the act who best transcended the genre to appeal to hard rock and heavy metal audiences as well.

image from photobucket.com


Joy Division

The Cure gets a nod this year and I think they are worthy of Hall induction – but not before Joy Division. These two groups most define the genre of goth rock, but Joy Division got there first. In a previous blog entry, I called them “one of the most important post-punk bands for creating the template for goth music” (Joy Division’s “Love Will Tear Us Apart charts: June 28, 1980). They only released two studio albums and gained a much wider audience in their re-incarnated-as-New Order form, but in launching goth rock, Joy Division also laid the platform on which much of ‘80s alternative rock – including The Cure – was formed. While we’re focused on groups who laid the foundation for the alt scene, The Smiths and Sonic Youth belong on the short list of acts which should be ushered in right after Joy Division.

image from sillything.altervista.org


Deep Purple

There’s still plenty of others worthy of Hall attention. I seriously considered giving this fifth spot to an artier, influential band like Kraftwerk, Roxy Music, Big Star, or Captain Beefheart. There’s also a serious case to be made for Stevie Ray Vaughan, that rare artist who moved an entire genre (the blues) forward while paying homage to its roots. However, the biggest and baddest act left deserving of enshrinement is Deep Purple. This would give the 2012 class a real dose of something the Hall has too long neglected – ROCK AND ROLL. What rock fan wouldn’t salivate at the idea that Deep Purple, Kiss, and Rush could all share a stage that night? The idea of a post-jam celebration including “Hush”, “Rock and Roll All Nite”, and “Tom Sawyer” just boggles the mind.

image from sonicabuse.com


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And This Year’s Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Nominees Are…


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September 27, 2011: The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame announced its nominees for the 2012 class. They are Beastie Boys, The Cure, Donovan, Eric B. & Rakim, Guns N’ Roses, Heart, Joan Jett & the Blackhearts, Freddie King, Laura Nyro, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Rufus/Chaka Khan, The Small Faces/The Faces, The Spinners, Donna Summer, and War. An act is eligible 25 years after the release of its first album or single. The nominating committee is comprised of 40 critics and music experts. Then ballots are sent to 500 critics who vote to determine at least 5 of the 15 nominees to be inducted. Those will be announced in November.

The 15 nominees have been ranked by Dave’s Music Database (number in parentheses after act). This is based on several criteria, including overall DMDB rating, rankings from Notinhalloffame.com (a website which has ranked 500 acts not yet voted into the Hall), and the act’s current induction chances as predicted by FutureRockLegends.com. Included with each act is commentary from both sites. Click on acts to link to their Rock Hall bios.


Guns N’ Roses (1) 1st nomination; first-year eligibility. NH rank: 15, FRL induction chances: 76%



“Many bands have a broad appeal and it is easy to figure out why. Guns N’ Roses exploded on the scene in the late 80’s and despite their dirty look and harsh Metal sound they became instant International Superstars; despite not subscribing to the traditional formula.” NH As FutureRockLegends.com (FRL) says, “See you in Cleveland.” F1


2. Red Hot Chili Peppers (2) 2nd nomination; eligible since 2009, NH rank: 5, FRL induction chances: 64%


“The NIHOF committee couldn’t agree on very much unanimously… [but thought] The Red Hot Chili Peppers was as almost as close to a lock to being a first ballot inductee to the Hall. We were wrong, but we don’t think their wait will be a long one.” NH They “will inevitably be inducted. It’s just a matter of when.” F1


Beastie Boys (3) 3rd nomination (2nd consecutive); eligible since 2007, NH rank: 8, FRL induction chances: 82%.


“It’s mystifying why they haven’t been inducted yet. They have some of the strongest credentials of any eligible artist.” F1 “Eventually as more Rap and Hip Hop artists become eligible for Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction, we suspect that our future NIHOF lists will be populated with them. Until then, we will have to settle for the few we do have, and our next selection, The Beastie Boys seems like a great place to start in respect to the genre.” NH


The Cure (4). 1st nomination; eligible since 2003. NH rank: 13, FRL induction chances: 57%


“Interesting nomination. Certainly fills a void on recent ballots, but it seems highly unlikely they’ll be inducted this year. Also in line for this ballot slot, The Smiths and Joy Division / New Order.” F1 However, The Cure may personify “the gothic image of a band (who ironically despised that label) better than any other group on this list.” NH


Donna Summer (5). 4th nomination (3rd consecutive); eligible since 1999. NH rank: 61, FRL induction chances: 56%


“We don’t have a problem admitting that at NIHOF we don’t have any issue with (and sometimes quite enjoy) the Disco genre. We aren’t sure what the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame thinks though. The Bee Gees are in, and they are constantly trying to get Chic in, but what of the woman most closely associated with Disco, Donna Summer?” NH FRL says to expect her to “be nominated again next year, because she won’t make it again.” F1


Heart (6). First nomination; eligible since 2001. NH rank: 33, FRL induction chances: 17%


“Seattle will be well represented as the Grunge era becomes Hall of Fame eligible. Until then, we think the Pacific North West has good representative in our top fifty with the Wilson sisters, A.K.A., Heart.” NH “Great to see Heart make the ballot after waiting 10 years. They recently made an appearance at the Rock Hall Museum as part of the ‘Women Who Rock’ exhibit.” F1


The Spinners (7) 1st nomination; eligible since 1986 (first year of inductions). NH Rank: 76, FRL induction chances: 8%


“The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame contains many an artist flying the Motown flag. Motown certainly became a star making label and under their label many legends were born. With that being said meet The Spinners, a band on this list who actually became stars once they left Motown.” NH FRL says “It seems likely that they will be ushered in quickly by the Voting Committee, who has probably been waiting for a chance to vote for them for years.” F1


War (8) 2nd nomination; eligible since 1996. NH rank: 57, FRL induction chances: 30%


“The United States of America has often touted itself as the ‘Melting Pot’ of the world. We will let some other website debate the validity of that statement. For now, we will simply slot the ironically named band, War as the band on our list that we think best serves the Melting Pot analogy.” NH As for getting in, there was “not a lot of traction the last time they were on the ballot. With heavy competition this year, they won’t get in.” F1


The Small Faces/The Faces (9) 1st nomination; eligible since 1991. NH rank: 59/131, FRL induction chances: 33%


The Small Faces may “very well the biggest band in England that barely made a dent in the U.S. Incidentally, this could be the biggest factor that keeps them out of the Hall.” NH As for The Faces, the Hall sometimes has an “urgency to induct [acts] based on the name(s) involved…Previous inductions of the two key members; Ron Wood (The Rolling Stones) and Rod Stewart (for his solo career)…[may create less] urgency to induct them.” NH Still, “Don’t count them out.” F1


Donovan (10). 2nd nomination (2nd consecutive); eligible since 1990. NH rank: 108, FRL induction chances: 11%


“When you have an icon in any field there always seems to be a clamoring for alternate versions of the original. Scotland’s Donovan was called by the some as the British answer to Bob Dylan. This wasn’t a very accurate description as Donovan’s musical vision certainly varied from Dylan; or any one else for that matter.” NH “Not sure there is much momentum behind him, but perhaps he fared well on last year’s ballot.” F1


Eric B. & Rakim (11). 1st nomination; first-year eligibility. NH rank: 77, FRL induction chances: 41%


“Huge in hip-hop circles” F1 and “they may have done more to further the genre of Hip Hop than anyone else on the latter half of the 1980’s.” NH Still, “to get inducted into the Rock Hall, you generally have to transcend your genre.” F1


Rufus with Chaka Khan (12). 1st nomination; eligible since 1999. NH rank: 159, FRL induction chances: 10%


“Chaka Khan’s name has been on the ‘Previously Considered’ list for years, but here she gets the nomination with her ‘70s band Rufus.” F1 “Many a band has become best known for launching a career of a lead singer who had gone on to eclipse that of his/her former group. Rufus is likely best known for introducing the world to the sultry Chaka Khan who managed to have a great career on her own. Having said that, the best way for both parties to get in to the Hall is to remember the work they did together.” NH


Joan Jett & the Blackhearts (13). 1st nomination; eligible since 2005. NH rank: 174, FRL induction chances: 16%


“We are going to play the gender card again on this selection. There are musicians who are ranked lower on this list who may have been more successful and played in much bigger venues, but it is our guess that nobody inspired more women to pick up a guitar than Joan Jett.” NH “Another focus of the ‘Women Who Rock’ exhibit. Many people wanted the Runaways to get in first, but the Rock Hall went with the more popular band.” F1


Freddie King (14). 1st nomination; eligible since 1986 (first year of inductions). NH rank: 355, FRL induction chances: 4%


“This year’s left field nomination. Never count these guys out of the voting.” F1 “Like other successful Blues…Freddie King came from the heart of the Texas and brought the Lone Star sound across the country.” NH


Laura Nyro (15). 3rd nomination (3rd consecutive); eligible since 1992. NH rank: 157, FRL induction chances: 31%


“Laura Nyro must have some strong advocates on the Nominating Committee.” F1 “Singer/Songwriters are often applauded for their lyrics as they should be. Few however, seem to be praised for their vocal skills as well. Laura Nyro was a rare talent who was that dual threat.” NH


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Monday, September 26, 2011

West Side Story debuted on Broadway: September 26, 1957

image from concordplayers.org

Originally posted 9/26/2011. Updated 3/9/2013.


Opened on Broadway: 26 September 1957, Released: October 1957 C, Charted: 23 October 1961 S
Tracks: (Click for codes to singles charts.)

Cast Album: 1. Prologue 2. Jet Song 3. Something’s Coming 4. The Dance at the Gym 5. Maria (1960, #78 Johnny Mathis; 1962, #48 Roger Williams) 6. Tonight (1961, #8 Ferrante & Teicher; 1961, #44 Eddie Fisher) 7. America 8. Cool 9. One Hand, One Heart 10. Tonight 11. The Rumble 12. I Feel Pretty 13. Somewhere (1965, #91 P.J. Proby; 1966, #26 Len Barry; 1986, #43 Barbra Streisand) 14. Gee, Officer Krupke! 15. A Boy Like That/I Have a Love 16. Finale

Soundtrack: 1. Overture 2. Prologue 3. Jet Song 4. Something’s Coming 5. The Dance at the Gym 6. Maria 7. America 8. Tonight 9. Gee, Officer Krupke! 10. I Feel Pretty 11. One Hand, One Heart 12. Quintet 13. The Rumble 14. Somewhere 15. Cool 16. A Boy Like That/I Have a Love 17. Finale

* As was common in the pre-rock era, multiple versions of a single song from a Broadway show would become hits. None of the versions above are actually on the cast album or soundtrack. All chart positions are from the U.S. Billboard pop charts.

Sales (in millions): 2.5 C, 8.0 S US, 0.6 C, 0.1 S UK, 3.1 C, 8.1 S world (includes US and UK)

Peak: 5 C, 154-S US, 113-S UK

Rating:

C cast
S soundtrack


Review: West Side Story is hailed as “one of the greatest musicals of all time.” RU Conceived by Arthur Laurents as a modern take on Romeo and Juliet, he recruited Leonard Bernstein for the music, Stephen Sondheim for the lyrics in what would become his Broadway debut, and Jerome Robbins as the choreographer and director.

The original Broadway production opened on September 26, 1957 at the Winter Garden Theatre and “ran for 732 performances (a successful run for the time), before going on tour.” WK It received a Tony Award nomination for Best Musical, but lost to Meredith Willson’s The Music Man. It did, however, win Tonys for choreography and scenic design.

The musical, set in New York City in the mid-1950s, explored the rivalry between two teen gangs, the Jets and the Sharks. Tony, a Jet, falls in love with Maria, who is the sister of Bernardo, the leader of the Sharks. It “galvanized Broadway with its vivid reinvention as a parable of racial intolerance and generational conflict.” SS It also “appealed to society’s undercurrent of rebellion from authority that surfaced in 1950s films like Rebel without a CauseWK

In 1961, the musical was made into a film. Directed by Robert Wise and Robbins, and casting Natalie Wood as Maria and Richard Beymer as Tony (with singing voices done by Marni Nixon and Jimmy Bryant), the movie snagged ten Academy Awards, including Best Picture.

The soundtrack was a huge seller and “unique touchstone for an otherwise rock-oriented audience.” SS It “spent more weeks at #1 in the charts (54) than any other album in history” WR and “made more money than any other album before it.” WK It also won the Grammy for Best Soundtrack or Cast Album.


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Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Pearl Jam's Top 30 Songs


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September 20, 2011 marks the worldwide release of Pearl Jam Twenty, a career-retrospective of the documentary’s namesake band directed by Cameron Crowe. To mark the occasion, here is a list of the top 30 Pearl Jam songs of all time. As always, DMDB lists are determined by a combination of songs’ sales, chart appearances, awards, and placement on best-of lists.



1. Jeremy (1991)
2. Alive (1991)
3. Daughter (1993)
4. Black (1991)
5. Better Man (1994)
6. Yellow Ledbetter (1992)
7. Even Flow (1991)
8. Given to Fly (1997)
9. Corduroy (1994)
10. Elderly Woman Behind the Counter in a Small Town (1993)



11. Not for You (1994)
12. Rearviewmirror (1993)
13. Spin the Black Circle (1994)
14. I Got Id (1995)
15. Wishlist (1998)
16. Nothing As It Seems (2000)
17. Last Kiss (1999)
18. Dissident (1993)
19. I Am Mine (2002)
20. Once (1991)



21. Hail Hail (1996)
22. Animal (1993)
23. Glorified G (1993)
24. World Wide Suicide (2006)
25. Nothingman (1994)
26. Off He Goes (1996)
27. Do the Evolution (1998)
28. Just Breathe (2009)
29. Porch (1991)
30. Tremor Christ (1994)




Awards:
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Sunday, September 18, 2011

Count Basie charts with "One O'Clock Jump": September 18, 1937


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Count Basie and his Orchestra crafted this instrumental jazz “landmark of the big band Swing Era” NRR around a head arrangement, an approach in which a song was developed through rehearsal and memorized without being written down. NRR The approach let musicians focus on the rhythmic drive NRR which was the main thrust of Basie’s and other Kansas City dance bands. Such songs were known as “stomps” and “shouts” or, in this case, a “jump”. CR

The approach also allowed soloists a lot of freedom. In “One O’Clock Jump”, extraordinary players like Lester Young, Herschel Evans, and Buck Clayton are allowed a showcase their interplay of brass and reeds. NRR

The song grew out of a rearrangement of Fats Waller’s “Six or Seven Times” CR and became a song originally called “Blue Ball”, CR which showcased the band’s ties to the blues. However, when Basie & crew were scheduled to perform the song for a radio broadcast, the announced balked at the risqué name so Basie retitled it “One O’Clock Jump”. CR

Basie was the first to chart with the song in 1937. The following year, Harry James and Benny Goodman had top 10 versions with it. However, the song has become known as “Basie’s signature theme, and the band played it at the end of their performances for more than 50 years.” NPR As a demonstration of this instrumental’s staying power and ability to cross genres, country group Asleep at the Wheel won a Grammy in 1978 for best country instrumental performance. TY Neil Peart, the drummer with progressive rock group Rush, used it to conclude his solos in concert from 2002 to 2004. WK



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Sunday, September 11, 2011

We Will Never Forget: September 11, 2001


Alan Jackson: Where Were You When the World Stopped Turning



Country music is often stereotyped as a redneck musical genre and it certainly has moments to confirm that. Toby Keith’s “Courtesy of the Red, White, and Blue” tapped into a revenge mentality with its “we’ll put a boot in your ass” line. However, Alan Jackson’s “Where Were You When the World Stopped Turning” was the song which best captured the overall sadness evoked by the average American. Sure, there were plenty of people who immediately wanted to go throttle someone, but Jackson tapped into the emotion of the people who just wanted to hold their loved ones close.



Bruce Springsteen: We Shall Overcome



As a Jersey boy raised in the shadow of New York City, Bruce Springsteen made a career of tapping into Americana with tales of teen angst, blue collar workers, and a celebration of where one was born. His entire album The Rising was written as a tribute for 9/11. It included the song “My City of Ruins” which was written prior to 9/11, but took on immense power as a commentary on post-9/11 New York City when performed for the television special America: A Tribute to Heroes.

It was a hard call between that song and what I did post. However, by the end of the day September 11, 2001, the song that was plastered across news coverage that resonated most for me was Springsteen’s cover of “We Shall Overcome”. This protest song has been covered by many, but took on a new poignancy through Springsteen’s reading of it in the context of a country suffering profound devastation.



Eddie Vedder: My City of Ruins



In 2009, “My City of Ruins” sadly took on relevanance again when its words seemed to be about New Orleans and the horror of Hurricane Katrina. Vedder performed the song for the Kennedy Center Honors as Springsteen looked on. Much like a visibly moved Springsteen, it is hard not to get choked up as one considers the song in the context of America’s two worst tragedies of the 21st century.



All Star Tribute: What’s Going On



Marvin Gaye’s classic “What’s Going On” has long been an anthem for pondering the state of the world. An all-star version of the song was recorded prior to 9/11 with the intent of benefiting AIDS programs in Africa. Bono, Britney Spears, Christina Aguilera, Jennifer Lopez, Gwen Stefani, Limp Bizkit’s Fred Durst, Destiny’s Child, Wyclef Jean, and Backstreet Boys were among the artists featured on the remake. When the song was released in October, a portion of the proceeds were also given to the American Red Cross’ fund for 9/11.



Limb Bizkit with Johnny Reznik: Wish You Were Here



I wish I could remember the context, but soon after the musical tributes starting flowing, I remember someone taking an unnecessary shot at Fred Durst of Limp Bizkit. If memory serves, the person was reflecting on who would be appropriate to tap into the pain and anguish Americans were feeling and slammed Durst as a musician no one could take seriously. With an assist from the Goo Goo Dolls’ Johnny Reznik, Durst proved otherwise on this Pink Floyd cover. At times the line “wish you were here” sounds like a memorial for the fallen. There’s a moment in the performance, though, when Durst looks straight into the camera and seemingly sings the line directly to Osama bin Laden as a dare to show his face.



Melissa Etheridge: Tuesday Morning



Sure, it made a political statement, but even the most hard-nosed anti-gay right winger would have to think twice if they heard this song. Etheridge powerfully reminds us that Mark Bingham, one of the passengers of United Airlines Flight 93, was gay. As one of the heroes who attacked the hijackers on the plane seemingly bound for the White House, was his heroic effort any less than that of his heterosexual counterparts?



Paul McCartney: Freedom/Let It Be



Paul McCartney was sitting on the tarmac at John F. Kennedy Airport in New York City when the planes hit the Twin Towers. He wrote the song “Freedom” the next day in response. He commented in an interview that he wrote the song as a sort of “We Shall Overcome”. He explained that the song’s notion of fighting for freedom tapped into the idea that an immigrant coming to America was saying, “Don’t mess with my rights, buddy. Because I’m now free.” WK



Sheryl Crow: Safe and Sound



I’ve never read anything to confirm this suspicion, but I suspect this song was originally written as a tribute to Kevin Gilbert. He was a little known singer/songwriter and musician (one of my personal favorites) who was part of the collective who brought Sheryl Crow’s Tuesday Night Music Club to the world. The pair dated and parted bitterly with more than a few fingers pointing at Crow that she was taking credit for more work than what she really did. This song could be interpreted as regret for how that relationship soured and sadness that Gilbert had died (he passed away in 1996). Of course, those feelings of pain and sadness also made for a fitting 9/11 tribute.



Neil Young: Let’s Roll



Todd Beamer was one of the passengers on Flight 93 who stormed the cockpit, attacking the hijackers and foiling their initial plans. His final known words were “Are you guys ready? Let’s roll!” The phrase became a battle cry for Americans ready to fight back against terrorism. Neil Young turned it into a song on his Are You Passionate? album released in November of 2011.



David Bowie: America



Bowie opened the October 20, 2001 Concert for New York City with his own appropriately themed “Heroes” paired with a cover of Simon & Garfunkel’s “America”. The concert celebrated the police officers and fire fighters and other heroes who put their lives on the line to respond to the tragedy.



Alicia Keys: Someday We’ll All Be Free



Donny Hathaway recorded this song for his 1973 album Extension of a Man. Over the years, it became an R&B standard covered by many artists. When Spike Lee used it for the film Malcolm X, it took on new meaning as a black anthem. When Alicia Keys, then one of the hottest new talents around, covered it for America: A Tribute to Heroes it became a message of hope for peace.



Wyclef Jean: Redemption Song



Wyclef Jean performed another of the powerful covers for America: A Tribute to Heroes with his take on Bob Marley’s “Redemption Song”. Rita Marley, said her husband was already facing his own mortality when he wrote the song in 1979 after just being diagnosed with cancer. He based the song on a 1937 speech by Marcus Garvey which called for people to emancipate themselves from mental slavery.



John Hiatt: When New York Had Her Heart Broke



Hiatt wrote this song in the days after 9/11, but had mixed feelings about recording it. It took ten years before he felt comfortable, finally putting it on his 2011 Dirty Jeans and Mudslide Hymns set. It is marked by a powerful video which shows New York’s fire and police departments responding.


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Saturday, September 10, 2011

The Top 100 Groups/Duos of All Time

Recent posts on the best songs from Queen and Led Zeppelin (and an upcoming Pink Floyd list) have sparked a curiosity over what the best groups of all time are. Based on chart figures, sales data, airplay, awards, and appearances on best-of lists (and not just rock groups from the last 50 years, mind you), here are the results:


The Beatles


1. The Beatles
2. The Rollng Stones
3. The Beach Boys
4. U2
5. Led Zeppelin
6. Queen
7. The Andrews Sisters
8. The Bee Gees
9. Fleetwood Mac
10. Peerless Quartet/Columbia Male Quartet


The Rolling Stones


11. Pink Floyd
12. Eagles
13. The Who
14. Aerosmith
15. The Doors
16. The Temptations
17. R.E.M.
18. The Mills Brothers
19. The Supremes
20. AC/DC


The Beach Boys


21. Chicago
22. Haydn Quartet
23. Nirvana
24. The Everly Brothers
25. Simon & Garfunkel
26. American Quartet
27. The Jackson 5/The Jacksons
28. Pearl Jam
29. Abba
30. Van Halen


U2


31. Four Tops
32. The Police
33. Creedence Clearwater Revival
34. Metallica
35. The Kinks
36. Velvet Underground
37. The Ink Spots
38. The Clash
39. Earth, Wind & Fire
40. Sly & the Family Stone


Led Zeppelin


41. Genesis
42. The Byrds
43. Black Sabbath
44. Bon Jovi
45. Kiss
46. Cream
47. Grateful Dead
48. Guns N’ Roses
49. Crosby, Stills & Nash/Young
50. The Drifters


Queen


51. Journey
52. Sex Pistols
53. Lynyrd Skynyrd
54. Carpenters
55. Radiohead
56. Alabama
57. The Band
58. The Isley Brothers
59. Ramones
60. Talking Heads


The Andrews Sisters


61. The Four Seasons
62. Deep Purple
63. The Allman Brothers Band
64. Blondie
65. Parliament/Funkadelic
66. Jefferson Airplane/Starship
67. Red Hot Chili Peppers
68. Daryl Hall & John Oates
69. The Miracles
70. The Pretenders


The Bee Gees


71. Steely Dan
72. Yes
73. The Cure
74. ZZ Top
75. Rush
76. Iron Maiden
77. Oasis
78. Dire Straits
79. The Carter Family
80. 5th Dimension


Fleetwood Mac


81. Beastie Boys
82. Boyz II Men
83. Duran Duran
84. The Platters
85. Def Leppard
86. Green Day
87. The Monkees
88. Foreigner
89. The Spinners
90. Brooks & Dunn


The Peerless Quartet


91. OutKast
92. Depeche Mode
93. The Stooges
94. The Impressions
95. Smashing Pumpkins
96. Jethro Tull
97. Roxy Music
98. Public Enemy
99. Backstreet Boys
100. The Smiths


Pink Floyd